Free To Good Home*

Many people looking for their next new pet have been known to recoil at the adoption fees charged by rescues, shelters and even private individuals. They state that they were looking in these places because they wanted to “rescue” a pet, or didn’t want to pay breeder prices. Some become indignant that a shelter would charge such a large amount. Why does it cost so much to rescue a pet?

Adoption Fees

There are several reasons for adoption fees, especially for animals taken in by a rescue group or organization. When these organizations take in a pet they often cover things like:

  • Wellness Vet check
  • Vaccines (5-way and Rabies)
  • Spay/Neuter
  • Microchip

In addition to feeding, watering, and general care and wellbeing of the animal until the perfect home can be found, some rescue groups will even take sick or injured animals that require hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in surgeries and medicines.

Furthermore, when these pets are adopted out, they don’t always fit into that new home and are sadly returned and much of the process has to be repeated to make sure the animal is still healthy.  The adoption fees often don’t cover these costs and the organizations must rely on donations to keep afloat.

Breeder Fees

For some animal breeders it is a hobby, for others a business. There is nothing wrong with a healthy breeding program. Purebred animals are important to many professions and lifestyles. For the hobbyist breeder, the fee is most likely to cover expenses and make a little bit of money on the side. For the business breeder there are more expenses that go into health testing and selecting a good match in a breeding pair. Their goal is to make money and support their family, but can also be to better a particular breed. Some expenditures that will go into a purebred pet are:

  • Health testing parents (genetics, eye exams, blood tests, and x rays)
  • First vaccinations
  • Deworming
  • Wellness vet check
  • Maintenance of babies for at least the first 8 weeks

Remember, as you search for your new furry best friend, it’s likely someone has already put a lot of love and money into the care of that animal, and they want to make sure it goes to a safe home. Save up for the rehoming fee; it’ll be worth it.

*Free To Good Home

In addition, pets offered for free can easily fall victim to pet flippers and baiters. Flippers will take your free pet, then turn around and sell it. Baiters are far more nefarious. They will take your beloved pet, and turn them into bait for fighting dogs; all types of pets can and have fallen victim to this horrible fate. Not to mention, if you are trying to place a Pitbull, Rottweiler, or other power breed, that sweet pup may end up fighting, quite literally, for his life. If you find yourself needing to rehome your pet, consider asking a rehoming fee. Even a moderate fee can deter these groups, and protect your animal.

If you have questions about adoption fees or rehoming your own animal, or if you suspect animal abuse call:

  • North Eastern Washington Humane Society (509) 563-4040  (Stevens County)
  • Spokane Humane Society (509) 467-5235, ext. 219.   (Spokane County)
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